Whataburger

Whataburger
Whataburger
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What’s the best Whataburger you ever had?

That’s a question a friend of mine likes to ask. Admittedly this is not a hotly debated topic in Texas, but it is not an uncommon point of discussion either. . I tell him that I cannot tell him about the best Whataburger I ever had until I first tell him about the time I most wanted one, which of course led to the best one I ever had.

Many years ago I took a job in Africa. While there I just couldn’t find much to eat that I liked. I lost about twenty pounds in six months.

It was at this point of mild starvation that a friend of mine back in Texas sent me a three by three foot poster of a Whataburger. Hot cheese and lettuce and chopped onions cascading seductively down the sides.

I think that was the cruelest thing my former friend could have done .He had me Whataburger dreamin’ for months.

When I flew back into DFW, after a year in the African hinterland, I got a Taxi and said, “Take me to the nearest Whataburger.”I got a double-meat double cheese, with chopped Jalapenos.
I Whatasized the fries and the Coke and I chased it all with a Chocolate Shake and an Apple Pie.

Now that was the best Whataburger, indeed the best meal, I ever had..

I am not alone in this experience.

Soldiers on leave from posts around the world go straight to Whataburger when they get home. And they eat every meal they can there while on leave.

If the Pentagon would make MRE Whataburgers, it would lift morale.

Some people who live in Whataburgerless states will drive a couple of days to get a Whataburger. They don’t even check into a hotel. They just eat one, take one to go, and drive back home.

There are other Whataburger connoisseurs who feel that a certain Whataburger Restaurant makes the best Whataburger and they will drive 60-70 miles in this holy grail type quest to get what they feel is the Whataburger of Whataburgers.

Whataburger is a Texan chain, born in Corpus Christi back in 1950. It was started by a burger visionary named Harmon Dobson on Ayers street. His goal was a simple one. In a time of small burgers, he wanted to make one that was so big it would take two hands to hold it and so good that with one bite people would say, “What A Burger!”

And it was true. When my mom used to take me and my two brothers to Whataburger as kids, she would spread newspapers across our laps in the back seat, and then cut the burgers in half so we wouldn’t make a mess of her protective plastic seat covers.”

Today there are 735 Whataburgers across the Southern U.S. and Northern Mexico proving 24 hours a day, seven days a week, that everything is bigger and better in Texas.

I’m W. F. Strong. These are Stories from Texas. Some of them are True.

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By 88FM